Came to learn advance nursing practices - Korea Times

It’s another great news day at AHS! Last Friday’s issue of the Korean Times carried a story by reporter Pan Kim featuring a Korean delegation that visited Highland Hospital. The reporter had opportunity to visit with Dr. Hyeong Sik Ahn, Professor of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University; and Ko Young, General Director with the National Health Insurance Service, as well as others in the delegation. Following a discussion with Chief Nurse Executive Kinzi Richholt, and VP Patient Care Services Reshea Holman, the group toured the Acute Care Tower with stops at the Family Birthing Center, Intensive Care Unit, and the 7th and 9th floor medical surgical units.

Our sincere appreciation to Kinzi and Reshea for leading the visit, to Theresa Cooper, Siobhan Wilson, and Jovita Okorie for taking time to welcome our guests, and to Louise Nakada for coordinating the tour. We also appreciate Sambo Ly and the Interpreter Services team’s for translating the article to share, and have also attached the original version. Enjoy!


The Korea Times
CAME TO LEARN ADVANCED NURSING SYSTEM

The Korean Government is in the process of integrating nursing services and unlicensed assistive personnel services for hospital patients.

AHS is an integrated public health system with 9 hospitals; it is the home of 1,100 medical doctors. Highland is one of the nine hospitals. They had a meeting with Chief Nurse Executive Kinzi Richholt, and Patient Care Services Vice President Reshea Holman where they questioned the proportion of nurses to patients, caregiver roles, cost, and patient satisfaction.

Nursing-Nursing Care Integration Services is a system in which nurses and nursing assistants provide full services to inpatient for 24 hours. Currently, family members or privately hired caregivers take care of the hospital inpatients in Korea.

The new system started at 13 hospitals as a pilot program in 2013. It was expanded to 28 hospitals in the following year. Since 2015, it has been expanded to hospitals under the umbrella of National Health Insurance.

Young Ko said “the number of hospitals adopting the new system will increase every year, and all hospitals in Korea will adopt it by 2018.” He also says that they will visit other public facilities, Stanford Children’s Hospital and UCSF in order to adopt the good measure.

They will further explore the Alameda Nurses Association, California State Department of Public Health and Hospitals, and will return to Korea on August 23.

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