Dr. Wong Releases Insights On Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

On October 19th, 2015, two author insights were released by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) by Dr. Robert Wong on obesity and metabolic syndrome.  In addition the College has also offered a series of pre-recorded video press briefings which feature the insights of Dr. Wong amongst other  leading gastroenterology experts as a teaser to the upcoming ACG 2015 in Hawaii (The Premier GI Clinical Meeting & Post Graduate Course for ACG).

Press Briefings Below:

Older Age and Hispanic Ethnicity Are Associated With Significantly Higher Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Author Insight from Robert Wong, MD, MS, Attending Physician, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Director, GI Education & Research, Highland Hospital

metabolicWhat’s new here and important for clinicians?

The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is rising in the U.S., with nearly one third of all adults affected by this disease syndrome. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, two disease states that account for a significant proportion of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. As individuals age, the risk of metabolic syndrome increases.

In addition, females and Hispanics demonstrate the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the U.S. Identifying groups at highest risk for metabolic syndrome is important so that resources for education and prevention can be effectively targeted to these high-risk populations. Clinicians should be vigilant to screen for and recognize metabolic syndrome so that early interventions can be implemented, such as aggressively managing hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and obesity.

What do patients need to know?

Metabolic syndrome is an important disease state that leads to major health consequences such as heart disease and liver disease. Conditions that increase one’s risk for metabolic syndrome include hypertension, diabetes, abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and obesity. Certain populations are at higher risk for metabolic syndrome, including older individuals, females, and those of Hispanic ethnicity. Implementing healthy lifestyle and dietary behaviors can help reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome and its related health consequences.

Read Abstract (Maria Aguilar, Taft Bhuket, MD, Sharon Torres, Benny Liu, MD, Robert Wong, MD, MS)

One in Five U.S. Adults Who Are Not Obese Have Metabolic Syndrome

Author Insight from Robert Wong, MD, Director, GI Education & Research Highland Hospital

metabolic2What’s new here and important for clinicians?

The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is rising in the U.S., with nearly one third of all adults affected by this disease syndrome. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, two disease states that account for a significant proportion of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. While obesity and weight gain increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome can and does occur in patients without obesity. Our current study demonstrated that nearly one in five patients who do not have obesity still have metabolic syndrome. This emphasizes the importance of recognizing the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, to improve the early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome so that early interventions can be implemented to reduced long term health consequences.

What do patients need to know?

Metabolic syndrome is an important disease state that leads to major health consequences such as heart disease and liver disease. Conditions that increase one’s risk for metabolic syndrome include hypertension, diabetes, abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and obesity. While being overweight and obese can increase your risk of metabolic syndrome, it is also important to treat and optimize other risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, and abnormal cholesterol levels.

Read the abstract (Maria Aguilar, Taft Bhuket, MD, Sharon Torres, Benny Liu, MD, Robert Wong, MD, MS)